From Weft to Wight!

crazy woman

My good self performing in durational Live Art / Dance work ‘The Last Knit’, by Annika Kompart. Image: Natalia Iwaniec

“In weaving, the weft is the term for the thread or yarn which is drawn through the warp yarns to create cloth. Warp is the lengthwise or longitudinal thread in a roll, while weft is the transverse thread. The weft is a thread or yarn usually made of spun fibre. The original fibres used were wool, flax or cotton.

Hand looms were the original weaver’s tool, with the shuttle being threaded through alternately raised warps by hand. Inventions during the 18th century spurred the Industrial Revolution, with the “picking stick” and the “flying shuttle” (John Kay, 1733) speeding up production of cloth. The power loom patented by Edmund Cartwright in 1785 allowed sixty picks per minute.

A useful way of remembering which is warp and which is weft is: ‘one of them goes from weft to wight’.” (Extracts from Wikipeda)

katy7

Image and Textile Installation in Detail: Katy Devereux

Local Textile Artist Katy Devereux, Vocal Artist Georgie Buchanan and myself are soon to embark upon Warp+Weft: a multidisciplinary journey through Textiles, Dance and Sound! We doubt it will go from weft to wight as planned, since creative journeys never do stick to a straight path, but nevertheless, we’re very excited about where it might wander. (Just watch out for the ‘shoddy’*, we don’t want anything getting stuck in that pipe!)

To begin, here’s our 100 word extravaganza of a description for the lovely folk at The Arts Council:

Warp+Weft is a two month interdisciplinary collaborative Arts project, interweaving the skills and experiences of local women in Art and Industry to create a multi-layered journey encompassing Textiles, Dance and Sound. Through a series of workshops with a group of local ex-Mill working women aged 55+ the project will engage with Calderdale’s rich Textile heritage to explore wider themes of womanhood, work and industry. It will culminate in a residency followed by a Live Event and Installation reinterpreting local heritage though experimental art and sound, taking place at the 1830 Gallery at The Artworks during Heritage Open Weekend. The project will be documented through a diverse range of media, including blog, film & photography.

Since there’s no word count on this blog, I’ll begin at the beginning. Three ’emerging’ artists (that’s what they call us!), sat in a room. Look out at hillside and mills. Consider collaboration. Put heads together. Goes a little something like this…

Apparently, landscapes remind a person of who he or she is. In the belief that we can only begin where we are, we asked; what about the Mills that are written across our local landscape? Such man-made industrial environments and machinery were at the forefront of a revolution which changed the way human beings lived and worked forever, not only in our local region, but across the world. What of the women who worked in them in years gone by; our families, our ancestors, our sisters across time? We make Art, they made Industry. What’s the connection between past and present, people and place, art and industry? How can we explore those loosely bound threads and weave it all together anew?

Through a process of excavating the stories of a group of local women, combined with construction, occasional deconstruction, and live performance, this collaborative project aims to re-envisage and re-animate The Artworks’ 1830 Gallery, formerly Shaw Lodge Mills (one of the longest running Textile Mills in the local area, owned by the Holdsworth Family, it remained open until as late as 2008).

The Artworks; left, exterior of the building, right, interior of the 1830 Gallery

things fall apart

Things Fall Apart, Exhibition by Katy Devereux, 2010

Based in an understanding of the often under-appreciated embodied intelligence present in all kinds of physical work, the project will explore the experiences of a group of women who worked in Calderdale’s Textile Industry. We want to listen to their stories and experiences, and yup, you guessed it, interweave these with our arty shenanigans!

Perhaps we’ve been reading too much Studs Terkel (author of bestseller ‘Working: People talk about what they do all day and how they feel about it’. Check it out, it’s fascinating and we highly recommend), but we want this project to offer a space for the re-interpretation of the humanity and poetry of the Mill worker in texture, sound and motion, as remembered and lived through the body by local ex-Mill workers.

We want to explore the relationship between man (or woman, in this case) and machine. Between community, industry, transience and transformation. Between three art-forms traditionally associated with the feminine, and the inner workings of the factory floor in the once great Textile Industry of our local area.

Once upon a time in the days of old, workers kept time by song. When the industrial revolution arrived, mechanical time took over and workers would lipread over the sound of heavy machinery. Repetitious and laborious tasks were not universally hated, although they were by some (we have already gathered many a tale of health & safety nightmare, accidents and incidents occurring none too infrequently at times); yet several women have already spoken to us about their enjoyment of this work, of being ‘tomboys’, of it’s smells and sounds.

GEORGIE

Vocal Artist Georgie Buchanan making magical sounds with a ragtag of instruments and her exquisite voice in an attic somewhere. Sneaky peek of her tones on the link below:

One woman who worked in the Mills in latter years even has a theory that certain classic Northern Soul dance moves originated in the movements made by Mill workers! We wonder, can we as live human performers become an art machine of sorts, a human choir choreographed, with machinery all mingled in with the found sounds and noises made possible by the next step in the industrial revolution – electricity! For this, electronic musician and multi-instrumentalist Anthony Smith, who produces under the name ‘Ruma Gilah’ (Malaysian for ‘Madhouse’), will join us.

We’re not sure what it will look or sound like, because there’s still so many stories to hear and experiences to encounter, but we hope you enjoy following us, from weft to wight or wherever we go.

Too rarely is the honest work of local people in industry honoured. So many things these days are boxed up and prettified, dissociated from where they came from, and much gets lost in the process. This project is a chance to tell some stories differently: it won’t be the same, because everything changes, but it will be a little bit of a lot of things, all woven together again.

I’ll leave you with a little dance I did a while ago. Complete with the dulcet tones of our very own Yorkshire born David Thomas Broughton, on forgetting where you come from and returning, along with some words of wisdom on the value of movement by the legendary Dance Artist Steve Paxton.

 

*A local lady we met at an art group told us about ‘shoddy’ getting stuck up the pipes where she worked. Here’s the Wikipedia definition: “Recycled or remanufactured wool. Historically generated from loosely woven materials. Benjamin Law invented shoddy and mungo, as such, in England in 1813. He was the first to organise, on a larger scale, the activity of taking old clothes and grinding them down into a fibrous state that could be re-spun into yarn. The shoddy industry was centred on the towns of Batley, Morley, Dewsbury and Ossett in West Yorkshire, and concentrated on the recovery of wool from rags. The importance of the industry can be gauged by the fact that even in 1860 the town of Batley was producing over 7000 tonnes of shoddy. At the time there were 80 firms employing a total of 550 people sorting the rags. These were then sold to shoddy manufacturers of which there were about 130 in the West Riding. Shoddy is inferior to the original wool; “shoddy” has come to mean “of poor quality” in general (not related to clothing), and the original meaning is largely obsolete”. (Source: Wikipedia)

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Dancing Precarity: An Open Letter A Spam A Resistance

I just got this and it’s excellent!!

“Dear community & beyond,
This is,
A spam A letter A resistance A performance,
In dancing & despair & destitution,
To whom it regards, in solidarity.
Don’t be wary, I am not a fraudulent spam.
No money, no cheques, no hacking of bodily software.
Here is an Open Letter as video letter attached.
Youtube: 

I appreciate your listening.
Thanks in advance.
From Anonymous Artist in London”

Creative Profile: Jane Samuels

A fascinating ‪#‎CreativeProfile‬ on local Artist Jane Samuels: ‘Activist and vegan, psychogeographer, prolific drinker of cheap whiskeys. Inventive dancer.’ Basically, my kinda woman…

 

 

Terrain/Anatomical Landscapes: (Lungs) “Terrain/Anatomical Landscapes: Leighton Moss”

1.       First of all, thanks for being our Creative Profile! We love your work, but also your twitter description (especially the bits about prolific whiskey drinking and inventive dancing!) For now though, let’s stick to the art. You describe yourself as a Psychogeographer; what is Psychogeography, why do you do it, and what relationship does it have to your work?

Ha! The whiskey fuels the dancing! Psychogeography at its most fundamental is about connection. It stems from the work of Guy Debord and the Situationists, who felt that the city is alienating, and that new approaches were needed to fully connect with the environment and with life. It involves walking practice: the derive (‘walking’ is the used term, but it’s important to add that the derive can be done with assistive technologies like wheelchairs too: I’m keen for it to be an inclusive practice). By exploring the environment and really taking notice, or by using spectacle and intervention (unusual events in familiar places), we use space in new ways, and invite deeper engagement. It’s this connection with place I’m looking for in my own work: making little discoveries.

 

2.       Rewinding back a couple of years, what did The Abandoned Buildings Project involve?

The Abandoned Buildings Project is a long-term, ongoing part of my practice, though it’s on hiatus right now. It involves exploring abandoned buildings (houses, hospitals, factories, asylums…), and trying to find something of their former lives while also acknowledging their emptiness and the strangeness that takes over when places are left behind. I take a cast of people with me dressed as Pooka (an Irish sprite that comes out when people are absent), and we create scenes that respond to the space. Back in the studio I build the photographs up into three-dimensional models, recreating the spaces and inviting people to carry out an exploration of their own. The hope is that this offers the audience a glimpse into places that most of us don’t get to see.

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3.      Can you tell us a little about the projects you’re currently working on?

Currently, I’m working on my drawing series Terrain: Anatomical Landscapes. It deals with the human body and our deep connection/conflict with the land, and combines human anatomy with elements of landscape. Each piece represents a single visit to a single location, so is narrative, and some also address bigger political and environmental debates (currently I’m working on Terrain/Anatomical Landscapes: Gloucester, which looks at the ongoing Badger Cull). It’s a return to my first and main love in that it’s graphite drawing. That felt like an appropriately organic process.

 

4.       Terrain: Anatomical Landscapes sounds fascinating and is a departure from your previous work in terms of form and aesthetic. What is its relationship to your earlier works?

The main thread that runs through Terrain remains the same as runs through all my previous work: it’s about place and the deep and often difficult human relationship with it. The drawing, sculpture, photography and writing are all different ways of searching for that same understanding and connection. For the Abandoned Buildings Project, the photographic constructions give me the element of realism I wanted. This time the pencil work lets me really play with the space.

 

5.       The writing on your walking blog is starkly beautiful, and very poetic. Has writing always been a part of your practice?

There’s a long tradition of walking and writing, with writers like Will Self and Robert Macfarlane being particularly popular at the moment.  It’s a way of capturing and sharing experience in a way that photography and drawing maybe can’t, and it’s long been something that helps me understand the world. I’ve written and explored less this year (a broken leg has kept me indoors), so I’m really exited to be starting that process again.

 

6.       You’re both an artist and an activist – or an artivist, as they’re now calling it! What’s the relationship between art and activism to you, and how do you balance the two?,

Ha! I don’t know if I’m an artivist. Political ideas in my work are usually less overt than say Banksy, but my activism centers around rights and freedoms, and my work is a natural extension of that. I have a lot of thoughts about how we use urban and rural space, and for me, it would be impossible to explore those environments without those thought processes creeping through somewhere.  My work sometimes reflects my activism (and challenges it too), sometimes it forms part of it. Much art can in some way be read as political: even when not overt or even intended, it often speaks of the political contexts of its time.

There’s also a charge that psychogeography is too white, male, ableist and middle class. While I believe those male voices are important and welcome, I and other women from all backgrounds, belief systems, politics and disabilities are busy challenging that stereotype by just keeping working in the field.

 

7.       When I see your work I observe multiple paradoxes, between the natural world and the man-made or public and private space, for example. What are your thoughts on this?

There are a lot of those conflicts in there: the work often comes from the tension they create. What happens to the familiar when it’s fundamentally changed? How does the public live in an increasingly private city? What happens when you push the boundary a little? I see Urban and Rural as less of a paradox and more different sides of the same coin. On the face of it, nature is often the antithesis of the urban disconnect. We go to the wilds to ‘find ourselves’ when we’re lost in modern living. But in reality, the UK countryside is as carefully managed and constructed as the city. We’re there because we’re allowed to be, and there’s often some conflict there too. We’ve denuded our wilds and created monocultures in places that were once forested, and our development is stamped all over the hills. Just like the city, there are conflicts between man, the individual and the environment, so paradoxes yes, but profound similarities too.

 

8.       Looking back, how did you get to where you are now, artistically? What points on the map were instrumental in leading you to your current artistic incarnation?

My walking really started during my degree, not least because my partner and I were skint and living in a flat so dilapidated the internal walls collapsed. A local kid had started letting himself in through the bathroom window (which was funny because the front door didn’t lock): we started to spend our time outside, walking the city. We were just completely in love with the streets and the people we met. I started reading walking theory that fed into my work, and by the time I did my MA walking became practice and theory. Around that time, I was lucky enough to get involved with a Manchester Psychogeography festival called Terrains Reimagined: International Perspectives (or TR:IP), which allowed me to meet people working in the field, and lead to other exhibitions and TV and Radio coverage.

Since then, social media (especially Twitter and Instagram) has proved invaluable. It offers a community of artists and theorists, real world opportunities,  lots of new ideas, and I’ve been lucky enough to have been picked up by bloggers and writers. That led to my inclusion in “the Instagram Book” last year. It keeps me working too: there are people to talk to who keep you rolling.

 

9) What’s next?

Next year is looking busy. I’m continuing the Terrain: Anatomical Landscapes series, and beginning a new project called “The Year of Living”, which will begin in January and involves asking my social media followers to send me to their favorite places and creating works about them, once a month, for the year.

The Loitorers Resistance Movement is a fantastic Psychogeography group based in Manchester, lead by Morag Rose. I’m  working with them towards their retrospective next year at the Peoples History Museum, Manchester, for a three Month program of films, events, walks and gallery show. We’ll be selecting contributions in Jan, then curating the show next year. I’m incredibly excited about that: I’ve just begun looking at the proposals and there’s some great stuff in there.That’ll also be my first showing of Terrain/Anatomical Landscapes which is the realisation of a great deal of work. Finally I’m thinking about beginning some walks in Calderdale, for a new Calder Psychogeographic group. I’m hoping it’ll be the start of something interesting.

 

Visit Jane’s website http://www.milliondollaryack.com/GhostStations/

Follow Jane on Twitter @ JaneSamuels

Creative Visions 09: The Art Party – FILM SCREENING | home

I’m now working  part-time for a network for the Creative and Digital Industries in my area called Creative Calderdale. Here’s a copy of the first article I wrote for the website about an event we’re organizing in February. I’ll post summat about the rest of my recent shenanigans when I get a mo. For now, peruse this at your pleasure…

Creative Visions 09: Art Party – FILM SCREENING

Creative Calderdale is delighted to announce a screening of the unique and provocative Art Party at 6pm on Thursday February 4th at The Elsie Whiteley Centre. The film is the latest in a series of cutting-edge collaborations between artist Bob and Roberta Smith, and filmmaker Tim Newton. Part documentary, part punk-road movie and part political fantasy, Art Party charts the journey to the 2013 Art Party Conference, where Bob and Roberta Smith and other speakers championed the importance of art, its place in the education system, and in society in general. The screening, made possible courtesy of HOME Artist Film, will also be followed by a panel discussion led by regional arts and education professionals. Book your ticket for Creative Visions 09: Art Party here.

Presumably, Bob and Roberta Smith’s dual-personality moniker is inspired by his sister – who happens to be a psychiatric nurse who goes by the name of Roberta. This choice of name implicitly suggests a creativity which is inseparable from more overtly pragmatic social issues, and indicates the boundary breaking nature of Smith’s work. Smith clearly has a preoccupation with using art as a tool to create positive social change, and is also interested in notions of amateurism and failure.

Smith is primarily known for his ‘slogan art’, a practice which involves the daubing of a few choice words in brightly coloured lettering on banners or discarded boards of wood. These slogans are usually humorous, irreverent, politically-charged musings which often support his activist campaigns, such as the 2002 amnesty on bad art at Pierogi Gallery, New York. This approach has ensured that Smith is an artist who is respected, but perhaps not wholly accepted by the mainstream ‘high art’ world, and we might safely imagine that this is a position Bob and Roberta would approve of!

Nevertheless, Smith has exhibited worldwide and has also been the curator of several public art projects, such as Art U Need and Peace Camp. Back in 2011 Bob and Roberta made waves with Letter to Michael Gove, the oversized painted-word response to the former Education Secretary’s proposed eradication of art from the British school syllabus. This was the work from which the 2013 Art Party Conference evolved.

Held in Scarborough and supported by The Art Fund (the national charity for art), The Art Party offered an opportunity for a diverse range of artists and organisations to discuss and celebrate the importance of art. The National Society for Education in Art & Design launched their alternative curriculum at the conference, and a range of film screenings, interviews, debates, discussions and workshops were held. In true Bob and Roberta style, this was accompanied by banners, readings, performances, artworks, calls for action, and a touch of humour and mischief. As night fell the ‘party’ was put into Art Party by an array of live bands and DJ sets.

Throughout both preparations and conference, filmmaker Tim Newton was on hand to capture the various ‘happenings’. The resultant film contains an unusual blend of performance, interviews and imagined scenes; it is a genre-bending creation portraying a slightly surreal journey to and through the Art Party Conference. We’re looking forward to a very inspiring screening, alongside a lively and enlightening discussion about the place of art in both education and wider society, right here in the heart of lovely Calderdale!

yorkshire till i die

My pal is in this video. I was almost in it, but I knew I was going on a bender the night before and would be sleep-deprived, so I ducked out of it. I’m a lightweight and not afraid to admit it. In all honesty, I was all set to hate it anyway – distasteful Devvo and his pisstake Chav-antics. No tar. Arty lover of subtlety over here, yada yada yada. Anyway, I’m a div. When I actually watched it, I found this video sad, touching and honest. It’s a pretty good depiction of a life, as experienced by some Yorkshire folk.

Lately, I’ve started reading the comments section under articles and videos on the internet, in order to gauge a selection of folk’s true feelings, as expressed from a safely hidden spot behind their screens.  This can often be both disturbing and rage-inducing, but this time I spotted the below comment;

“If you look past the comedy there’s a pretty powerful social commentary that I feel will be lost on a lot of people. So weird to see the streets of Leeds again in a video like this.

Thanks for this video, I actually cried whilst watching to think of the times when I used to walk on those very streets and look about and think ‘this is my life, what do I really have? People don’t even know of the desperate state some of Yorkshire is in…”

I watched this a while back, when I’d only just decided to escape the big smoke, head for the hills and move back up North. I remember thinking, YES!! YORKSHIRE, I’M COMIN’ ‘OME!!! (coz there’s also green fields, rolling hills and my beloved dry stone walls, and it’s not called ‘God’s own Country’ for nowt.) It reminded me of some of the first lines of poetry I ever penned, of a street I used to live on, and of plenty of times, people and places from my life both past and present.

hull, hell and halifax, so the saying goes
a miserable elegy for my home, sweet home,
a place of pebble dash – and pubs,
some diamonds, lotsa rough…
but who can hate a place, i ask,
where everyone’s called love?

Yup, there’s no doubt about it. I am YORKSHIRE TILL I DIE !! xxx

mushrooming : dancing at the edge of my understanding

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by michael klien / steve valk / jeffrey gormley, from ‘the book of recommendations
I am in a discombobulating process of mind-body-bending, de-schooling, re-wilding, and imagineering. I am definitely dancing at the edge of my understanding !! Which can only be a good thing, or so I’ve come to believe. I have got this far, but it’s all still a bit blurry around the edges … you’re gonna need to just hold tight with me for a moment, the dancing part comes back later…
WHAT IF WE COULD LEARN: “to act (where many others don’t) and yet to question that action – in the very name of that action – while acting, [which] is the sublime fulfillment of what it is to be human – to be in open conversation with one’s world at all times. It implies a sensibility that transcends itself, and that therefore has the possibility of acting as the seed of a more conscious future” (a delicate activism, davidoff & kaplan).
WHAT IF WE COULD EXPERIENCE: “a felt shift from separation to connectedness. From being an individual somewhat isolated observer, looking for connectedness, to being essentially and intimately connected… Instead of being too busy to care, we notice what needs doing to look after the people and the environment around us, and you naturally do it” (guy claxton, on being touched and moved at the RSA).
I’ve long believed that change is only possible, firstly, through the revolution of individual consciousness. Any forced attempts at change merely echo the imperfect structures that bore the bullshit in the first place. At a micro-level, change happens first in the individual mind-body, and then via communication with others and our surroundings. What I didn’t realise was that my own understanding of consciousness, communication, and our relationship with the world, was still so limited… The phrase I have so often quoted from Krishnamuriti, that ‘I am you, you are me, and the world is us’, now takes on a fuller meaning.

HOW MIGHT WE FIRSTLY DEAL WITH THE PHYSICAL MANIFESTATION OF IDEAS, EMOTIONS AND EVENTS, IN ORDER TO PROMOTE SELF-HEALING IN OUR OWN DELICATE MINDY-BODY MATRIX? HOW MIGHT THIS EMANATE OUTWARDS INTO THE WIDER WORLD?
WHAT IF IMPROVED MIND-BODY INTEGRATION IS VITAL IN ALLOWING US TO ‘MEET’ THE WORLD MORE HOLISTICALLY, AS DESCRIBED ABOVE BY GUY CLAXTON?
WHAT IF THIS MEANS THAT THE SENSITIVE PROCESS OF EXPANDING SENSORIAL AWARENESS IS ACTUALLY BOTH PRAGMATIC AND PRACTICAL? WHAT IF IT’S NOT ‘JUST DANCING’?
WHAT IF I HAVE NOW HONED IN ON EXACTLY WHERE I NEED TO GO.
WHAT IF ANY ATTEMPT AT CHANGING OUR WORLD MUST ENTAIL A WIDER UNDERSTANDING OF CONSCIOUSNESS AND A DEEPER UNDERSTANDING OF HOW SUBTLE COMMUNICATION OCCURS?

*some thoughts*
the final act of meeting is the act of physical touch.
likewise, the final act of communication is the act of using symbolic language.
so much has already happened within you before you ‘decide’ to do something (new-wave science has proved it)
hence, conscious ‘free will’ is debatable, given the amount of unknowns…
which means that embodied intelligence, and other less appreciated ways of knowing (such as intuition), are REALLY BLOODY IMPORTANT! if we can cultivate the skills to ‘know’ in more ways than one, what might this mean for our way of living and being?

HOW MIGHT PRAGMATIC APPROACHES TO THIS SUBTLE ORDINARY MAGIC ENABLE US TO NAVIGATE EVER-INCREASING PARADOX? HOW MIGHT WE EXPAND OUR POTENTIAL AS HUMAN BEINGS THROUGH SUCH PRACTICES? HOW MIGHT THIS RADICALLY IMPROVE OUR RELATIONSHIP WITH OTHER HUMANS AND THE ENVIRONMENT?

This is the mushrooming of my understanding of what dance is, and can be. We are deeply implicated, interconnected beings, engaged in a dynamic entanglement with self – environment – other. I thunk it, I felt it, but now I’m TOTALLY CONVINCED!!!

PS. I apologize for all the caps locks, italics, and strange formatting!! WordPress is giving me gip, hence the lines of separation between paragraphs… and my mind-body is struggling to digest / process / compost all these half-formed realisations. Danke for your patience, friends!

humanimals, and the art of empathy

“Animals are so much more empathic than humans. They feel everything and they’re with you, but not because they expect to get anything… it’s just the most primal form of nurture … a way of release and interaction” says Nai Palm…

Lately I’ve been thinking, not just with my conscious mind, but with my whole mind-body matrix thing. I’m realising that one way for humans to learn to be more empathic towards the earth, animals and each other – is by healing the mind-body split within their own bundle of cells/skin/soul/bones, expanding their sensorial connectedness, and developing the ability to sense each other rather than constantly making ideas about each other.

MUCH LIKE THIS FELLA IS DOING HERE … MAN COMFORTS GORILLA WHO JUST LOST HIS MOM

We just need a wider, deeper understanding of how communication occurs and what consciousness is (see my earlier thoughts here), in order to appreciate and utilise the many forms of knowing available to us. There’s so much going on at a subtle level, and I believe that we need to cultivate the skills to listen to it. 

Check out this dude and his Chimpanzee work, for a practical example of the kind of sensorial development that I’m talking about. After spending two months volunteering in a sanctuary in Cameroon, this fella decided to create a ‘movement-based workshop exploring trans-species kinship with our closest relatives’. Check out his blog here for more info.

PS. Body-based healing practices and dancing are both pragmatic and useful! So there… and logic and ‘rational’ thought aren’t always the best way to respond (Just sayin’ yo).

PPS. I want to be the kind of artist that the Chimp workshop guy is – grounding my practice in the wider world. Facilitating experiences where change might happen, through this wider understanding of the relevance of movement/dance/whatever ya wanna call it. Trying not to compartmentalise so much and this is the point at which language starts to break down. My increasing over-sensitivity to this stuff makes it harder and harder to label, separate and symbolise.

PPS. I love nai palm !!!!!!!!!

poims @ parcel bar

Back at the start of August I was the visiting poet at Puzzle Poets up in Sowerby Bridge, in my hometown Halifax.

I’m fairly used to doing one or two poems, ten minutes of poetic ramble here or there … but this was a proper opportunity for some longer ranting, chanting and carrying on 😉 I had a super-good night, and folk there were very appreciative of my new poems, which is lovely and encouraging! After a year devoted entirely to the daaannce, it was a good while since I’d got my poetry on.

The compere, one John Foggin – well, I dunno how he does it. Flummoxes me how he comes up with those descriptions on the spot! And the open mic was just brimming with wordy goodness. I particularly loved ‘Barry The Bacteria’ and the one about public libraries – just ‘don’t mention the books’ these days – it’s all about new wave digital whatever communication… It was pretty spot on as an event, with poems covering folk festivals, the Trans-Siberian Express, dropping in splashes of haunting lyricism, ‘the sack of history’, and some Binyon and Hardy and Yeats to ‘remind us where we all come from’ (Foggin’s words!)

Afterwards, a lady grabbed me and asked me to do a gig at her bar in Hebden Bridge. Well shittin’ hell! That was my first request for a proper poetry gig by someone I’d never met before – not a group I’m involved with or a mate running an event or whatever… WOWZA. Exciting times. HAPPY HAPPY JOY JOY !!!!

Feel free to have a gander at what I did…

Poim listing as follows…

once again, i find myself in a relationship with a character from the beat generation
mind-body remix
the white rug of love
night-bus
the battle
crap consciousness
i’m not a nun, but…
stop making sense song
the good life
the healing fields
fuckyoga.com

the meaning of death dance

my relaxed solo rave to stephen jenkinson’s meaning of death video. the topic might seem heavy for a tuesday morning, but it’s seriously worthwhile heavyweight wisdom! i promise 😉

it’s taken me many viewings of his video to capture the fullness of what he’s saying – i got the general gist but chunks of it eluded me… however i kept feeling drawn to returning to his words, and every time i watched the video again i started to understand a little bit more about what he was saying, and what it means for the way we live…

somehow after a while it all starts to get just a little bit less heavy.

anyway, i did a dance to it. will let his words do the rest of the talking. enjoy 🙂

the black box sessions

Some relaxed solo raves, from a tired day in a black box, when I was knackered and at the end of my tether. Performance day was on it’s way and I felt uncertain, like I didn’t really know what I was doing. This was attempt number three at finding some sort of coherence. Big thanks be to Robbie Pallet for filming 🙂